Friday, March 28, 2014

Tasks as Appointments

I love lists.  To-do lists, shopping lists, cleaning lists... I just don't like doing the things on my lists.  However, the lists look nice on my planner pages.

Back in my Franklin Covey days, as a busy court reporter, I remember taking my to-do tasks and scheduling them in time slots on my daily calendar.  Covey's task priority numbers and the "4 quadrants" didn't work for me.  Everything I tried was really just more work and time that I couldn't spare.

The coolest thing about writing my tasks in with my appointments back then was that I naturally accomplished them throughout the day...because they were on my calendar.

Fast forward to now.  A busy farm lady, growing much of my own food and filling my pantry and freezers, running this crazy household with lots of animals and muddy boots, grandkid weekends and homeschooling one through the week, researching family history, and writing and blogging.  And knitting, if I find a few quiet moments.

And I have to say at this point that I have ADD and I am a very visible learner, and seeing things I need to do on my daily calendar makes a whole lot more sense to me.

Tasks that I don't want in a time slot go on that list somewhere on the page so I can notice them and, if I have a notion, do them.  If not, they move to the next day and might go in a time slot there.

The thing is, I have a harder time ignoring anything on my calendar than on a list. 

My DIYfish daily pages are perfect for my system; they are probably perfect for most visual people. They are also good for creative people who like to tweak things to their liking, and this is the real beauty of the system.

I think I'll stick with this Tasks as Appointments for a while and see if it works as good as it has the last few days.  I feel a lot more successful at the end of the day!



Thursday, March 27, 2014

The Thrill of the Plan

I've been absent.  I lose my focus quite often.  Mix in ADD and OCD, and I'm lucky to have found my way back here..

Honestly, I've been doing better here lately and being quite productive, all with the help of my Planner Addiction.



My Filofax Personal Windsor, a wonderful vintage 
species I found on eBay a few months ago.  I changed
my favorite color to deep red when I got this binder.

Then, not too long after Windsor, I spied a planner on Filofax USA that seemed to be calling my name.  She looked so soft and lush that I had to see more of her, so I started googling the web for more photos and reviews.  There wasn't a lot, but what I saw convinced me that I had to have this binder.  I waited patiently until she showed up on eBay at a deal not to be refused, all the way from the U.K.  


Her name is Aston.  She is capable of  being stuffed.   The best  
description of my Aston was on Philofaxy.  Seems Aston is an
almost overlooked prize.  

About the same time as Aston's arrival, I switched my inserts to a Life Mapping system from DIYfish, and I moved into planner heaven.  I guess someone like me, whose organizing mania goes all the way back to age 10, does best with something so adaptable to customizing.  There doesn't seem to be an end to what you can make this printable planning system do.  

I delegated my Red Windsor as my writing planner and Aston for everything else, including my wallet.  If I want to go smaller, I have a Pocket Filofax as well.  A rugged but lovable binder that can only be a "he."  


His name is Kensington, and he does look somewhat like
Aston.  Kensington is also a vintage find on eBay for a bargain.
He sits on a bookshelf with a few alien Daytimers 
and Franklin Planners, ready for action when the time
is right.  

I'm not currently looking for a new planner just now, but you never know when your heart will be lost to a new planner on the block.  I suppose that's the thrill of it all, and I don't think the thrill is ever gone.





Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Zucchini Lasagna, Pickles, and Bug Spray



Welcome to my Kitchen Domain, summer version.  I practically live in this room during this time of the year when my kitchen garden's got it going on.  Like most other gardeners right now, I'm up to here with zucchini.  And I'm loving it.

I save an incredible amount of money on groceries during the summer because we're eating mostly fresh from the garden.  Very little meat or poultry.

Today I made my own version of Zucchini Lasagna using my own tomatoes and store-bought crushed tomatoes, ricotta cheese, mozzarella, and all fresh herbs.  When the mother load of tomatoes arrive, I won't be needing the canned crushed.  I'll be crushing them myself.

Zucchini Lasagna



Enough zucchini, sliced as thinly as possible lengthwise, to make two layers in a 13-inch pan
As many fresh red, very ripe, tomatoes as you have, sliced thinly
One large can of crushed tomatoes from the grocer
One thinly sliced onion 
One bell pepper sliced thinly
One small-sized carton of ricotta cheese
One egg
About 2 cups of Mozzarella cheese
About a tablespoon of fresh basil, thyme, and Rosemary (about 1/2 teaspoon for dried herbs)

Beat the ricotta and the egg together until smooth.  Spoon a small amount of crushed tomatoes across the bottom of your pan.  Layer half your zucchini slices over that.  Top with half your sliced tomatoes, onions, and peppers.  Ladle half the remaining crushed tomatoes over the vegetables.  Sprinkle over that half the herbs.  Spread half the ricotta and egg mixture over the herbs.  Ladle and sprinkle half the mozzarella over that.  

For the second layer, place the rest of the zucchini slices over first layer, top with remaining sliced tomatoes, ricotta, herbs, and half of remaining mozzarella.  Top with remaining crushed tomatoes, and sprinkle rest of mozzarella over all.  Bake at 350 degrees for about an hour, testing that the zucchinis are fork tender.  

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Son Jeff loves pickles, so I'm letting some salted zucchini slices stand in the frig, which will become "Sweet and Spicy Zucchini Pickles" later tonight or tomorrow morning.  Found this recipe on Pinterest, pinned by My Pantry Shelf.  I'm looking forward to having these on my pantry shelf.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Also working on my own natural insect repellent using my fresh herbs.  Decided today, after being almost eaten alive by the mosquitoes in a Nashville park over the weekend, to make this and see how it works.  Those heavy chemical sprays make me sick and give me migraines.  Plus I don't think our lungs should be inhaling those fumes.  

Basically I boiled a cup of water on the stove and then added about a tablespoon each of spearmint, lavender, Rosemary, and thyme.  This mixture is sitting, covered, on the counter.  When it's cooled completely, I'll remove the herbs, add about a cup of alcohol (Witch Hazel is probably better, but I don't have any).  Then the mixture goes into a spray bottle.  I read where it's best to keep it in the frig and taken out when needed.  

I'll let you know how it works.  I'm serious bug bait for some reason, my blood type probably.  

Back to my kitchen domain.  Almost supper time.  Oh, we're having homemade vanilla ice cream with fresh peach slices.  Happy eating, ya'll.






Friday, May 24, 2013

Process


 Yes, I'm working on the book.

It doesn't look like it, but I do need some new dishcloths.  And other yarn projects too.  These pretty cloths come from Life After Laundry, Brenna, a frugal mom's site.

While I crochet these cute household products, I'm thinking.  Thinking about the book formatting, and the last chapter which I'm not happy with.  And the cover art and...

Well, I need to knit and crochet while I sort these things out in my head.  I do that best when I have yarn in my hands.  If my fingers aren't on the keyboard, they need to be holding needles or hooks.


This is my messy nightstand.  Sometimes I work on my bed.  When I need quiet and a private place to think.  Sometimes I write in a notebook...several notebooks, instead of the laptop.  

I work on long-term and short-term projects.  If I need to process small stuff in my head, I like to whip up a quick crochet cloth.  If I need to stew for a longer time to figure something out, I grab the Tiramisu blanket I'm crocheting.  I have another one I'm knitting.


I'm especially pleased with the Tiramisu blanket, pattern from Ravelry by Alicia Paulson.  So beautiful and simple, and an awesome process aid.  I've solved several difficult writing problems with the Tiramisu blanket.  Other life problems too.

When you need to process stuff, give yourself the gift of a few pretty and practical dishcloths and maybe for the hard stuff of life, try a Tiramisu blanket.

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Schmidts Farm in April

Apple Blossom Time...  the tree that produced the hundreds of
small, delicious apples last year is now loaded with white flowers.  Love looking out the dining room glass doors when we're eating, planning what I'll do with all the apples this year.






Of course I had to snip some branches for the table.   They don't last long inside, but they're beautiful while they do. 


In the herb garden, Oregano weathers over winter, something I hadn't known. At least here in middle Tennessee it does.  In my garden it does.  








And the Parsley weathered over too.










Seedling flats in the yard.  Tomatoes, peppers, more broccoli, Brussels sprouts.



Spinach coming along nicely.  Almost ready for that first tender salad.



Peas and Lettuce in rows, while the mint begins its trail around the sides of the bed.  Mint will take over a garden completely if allowed.  And it fights you when you go to pull it up.  Last year, Gary took some I pulled and planted it down by the spring in the woods.  And it all started a few years ago with one tiny mint plant.  It's Spearmint (Mentha spicata)


Close view of the lettuce and English peas.  Kind of got these out late, but I think they'll do okay.  I know the lettuce will.  We will trellis the peas soon.  Getting ready for salad time on the farm.












Tuesday, April 16, 2013

I Want to Wear White Socks

I want a clean kitchen floor.  I want it really bad.  I want it to stay clean always...in middle of the night, when I get up in the morning, when I go to cook dinner, when I come in from outside.

I have rugs and mats on the floor.  I guess they help a little.  But my kitchen floor still gets dirty.

I tried swiffering every day, even twice a day.  It stays clean for a few hours.

The true test of a clean floor:  Try Wearing White Socks!

I want my white socks to stay clean on the bottoms.

I walk across my kitchen floor, and my white socks are already dirty.  I take them off and drop them in the laundry basket.  Worn for about five minutes, and they're laundry fodder.

I don't like to wear shoes in the house.  I like socks.  I like white socks.  White socks that stay clean on the bottoms make me feel good and happy.  Clean white socks in the house.  My dream.

Isn't there a Dr. Seuss verse for white socks in the house?






Monday, February 4, 2013

February's Garden

 Gardening in Middle Tennessee means starting seeds indoors, or in a greenhouse or cold frame, for planting in spring, after last frost.

Last week we started broccoli and several varieties of tomatoes:  Early Girl, Bradley, Brandywine, and Celebrity.

This week we pick up grow-lights and buy more seed.

We're expanding the operation this year.  We did okay last spring, but always feel we could do better.  Always hoping for a bigger harvest to last over the winter.

Last week I used my last frozen Marconi Sweet Peppers for cooking.  Still have tomato sauce in the freezer and some peaches and squash. Oh, and a giant freezer bag of Last Spring's Strawberries, pretty and red.   Our homemade fruit jam got wiped out as Christmas presents, even the Winter Orange Marmalade I made in November.  Do I use those strawberries and make a batch of preserves, or save for a cold, dark day and make a glorious "fresh" strawberry dessert?

I have two cold bins of apples from our trees still in the back refrigerator that I need to do something with, while they're still good.  If making gluten-free pie crusts weren't so much work (for me anyway), every one of those apples would turn into apple pies in the freezer.  There's absolutely nothing like pulling a good, homemade apple pie out of the freezer to thaw and heat up in the oven on a busy day.

Last spring's broccoli was so plentiful and good, as were the Brussels sprouts, we're convinced these two veggies are worth increasing this year.  I'd love to have them in the freezer throughout the winter, using the last bags when the new ones are coming in.


First Broccoli Seeds Sown


Bradley Tomatoes in the Soil and Sun

Still got lots of seed to go, but I'm grateful we've at least got started...which is always the hardest part.


Friday, January 18, 2013

Pinterest Meal Management



Writing takes a lot of my time.  Add to that trying to keep the house together, clean and organized, doctor and dentist appointments, and I needed a streamlined plan for grocery shopping and cooking.

There's an app for that.

I'm a meal planner from way back, when I had four kids and and a job outside the home.  I got this from my then mother-in-law who planned her week's meals every Sunday.  She was also a penny-pincher, and that suited me because there was very little cash for groceries in my house.

 She would plan a roast for Sunday, beef stew for Monday, and so on and so on.  The "rubber chicken" type of planning.  If you're not familiar with it, it goes...A roasted whole chicken on Sunday, maybe a chicken and rice type thing the next day, chicken enchiladas might be next, all the way to chicken soup usually being the last thing.  Boiling the chicken in your crockpot is another way, separating the bones and skins from the meat and dividing it up for separate meals.

I still basically use this method, but I'm a lot more high-tech, having discovered how to streamline my process even better, and Pinterest is part of that, as well as some other great apps.

End of December, I put together a menu for the 31 days of January.  I've got a lot of writing I need to be doing, plus some doctors' appointments, yearly exams and the like, for myself as well as husband and son.  A lot going on.

I've been adding recipes to Pinterest ever since its inception.  That was the first amazing thing I jumped onto. I immediately saw this tool as my online filing cabinet.  A place for every recipe I gleaned from the web.

Rounding Up Your Recipes for Menus

As I have pinned any recipe I want to keep, I just go to Pinterest and find them.  Seeing a full-color picture of the dishes gives you ideas, and the process goes pretty fast.  I rounded up 31 menus in an hour or so.  I allow for leftovers on some days.  I pick my menus with my calendar beside me, noting the days we will be eating out or at church, or elsewhere.  Basketball season, we eat out most game nights.  If I see I'll be gone most of a certain day, I can plan a crockpot meal or soup and sandwiches.  I also have freezer meals for those occasions.

I've noticed that at the end of the month, I always have leftover menus--and the groceries to go with them--because you end up, for whatever reason, not using every single day's menu.  This is a good thing.  You've already saved having to buy as many groceries the next month.  


Printing Pinterest Boards:  I recently discovered the old fashioned "Control P" for print on Pinterest.  Open your board and simply pres Ctrl and P at the same time.  A menu opens up for you to print however you want.  I print to PDF, and then decide whether I want to physically print for my binder.  While the recipe itself isn't available, the web link below the picture appears.  This is a good backup, and a nice physical cookbook to have.


Organizing the Menus:

A lot of menu planners exist on the web, and I've used many, both paper and digital.  I still like to keep a calendar of menus in my notebook planner.  I'm one of those people who say, "What if the grid goes down?"  I need my lists.  One really cool thing about the monthly lists of menus is that you can use them all over again.  Talk about handy!

In my opinion, one of the best websites I've ever come across is Donna Young's Homeschool site.  Back when I homeschooled, about 10 years ago, I used this site over and over.  You can print out nearly any form you need for scheduling not only your students' studies and reports, but household  schedules as well.  Now she has even better, updated household forms you can download, including some great menu planners and even a members' submitted cookbook.  This helped me enormously when filling in my 31 menus.

Anyway, techie lover that I am, I like digital at my fingertips, on my phone and/or pc desktop.  I'm a Google Syncer.  My main calendar is in Google, which syncs to my phone. The home page on my phone contains a short list of my calendar, so I can see immediately what is happening for the net few days.  It's pretty easy to type in each day's menu on my calendar as a "Google task," and specify that I want Google to list my tasks in the calendar.

The Grocery List

Now that I know what I'm cooking every day, I can be at total peace about "What's for dinner?"   This is peace!    I never scramble around, moaning, "What do I do about today's dinner?"  I've been planning my meals this way for so long, I can't remember being stressed out about this facet of life.  I've got plenty of other things to stress about.

Having the ingredients for my menus is another de-stresser.  Sure, I might still have to pick up some items after my big shopping trip, but basically I have what I need.

This part is simple.  You just list all the ingredients from each menu.  On a piece of paper, or using one of those downloadable, printable lists where you put a checkmark in the little box beside any item you need, or you can type it in on your computer and print it out.

My favorite way is to have the list on my phone.  However, I do have a paper backup just in case.  You never know about that grid might be going down.

Recently I found what seems to be invented just for someone like me.  A Google app, ShopGlider.com.  It can be used on your computer desktop and/or digitally on your phone or tablet.  It has starter recipes you can use, and you add your own using categories. . Say you're having a party, you can have the menu items in just that category, and know when you go shopping what grocery items you need.  Check it out.  It might be for you.

I've been using Evernote about as long as it's been out.  It's an old friend.  It does everything.  I can't think of anything I can't make it do.  Before Pinterest, I saved all those pages from the web and gave them "tags."  Don't you just love tags?  I can put my grocery list in Evernote.  And, yes, Evernote syncs with my phone.  I use Evernote for a lot of my writing research.  It's the best thing I've discovered for any kind of research.  And, wow, EVERNOTE FOOD  has just come on the scene.



You have to see Evernote Food yourself to really understand how sophisticated this program is.  Hats off to some of the best programmers in the world, the Facebook techs.

Lastly, another very popular app is Cozi online, which provides your family with a...well, cozy calendar.  I've used it a lot and like it.  It just has limitations for me, but it is simple and easy to use and very well put together.  Cozi now has an iPad / iPhone app you can get to on Cozi.com's main site.



If you've made one of your New Year's goals to get a handle on the kitchen part of your life, you might like some of these ideas.

Part of my journey has been to cook wonderful food and have a great plan to help me.
























Thursday, January 10, 2013

Where the Journey Takes You




My journey has been to find many, many things:  answers, solutions, an abiding faith, peace, security, my strengths, self worth, and my great big family.  In finding family and stories, everything else I'm looking for falls into place.  Funny how that works.

Over on Rhine Girl, I've been lazy about posting the book's stories and, more importantly, the new finds that have turned up recently and unexpectedly...and where those discoveries lead now.

The holidays kind of kill me.  I get centered on the festivities and tune out  the rest of the world.  The older I get, the more it wears me out too.

But while I was living in the present, my Journey was unfolding behind the scenes.

My energy is revived.

Know that your journey goes on even while you're not actively pursuing it.

Once you set the wheels in motion

With Family History and Memoir writing, you invest a lot of time at the start.  You immerse yourself in research.  You stumble down paths only to hit brick walls.  You lose ancestors you thought were yours.  You give up sometimes.  You pick back up a lot.

You've started the journey in motion.  There's no turning back.

What is your journey?  What are you looking for?    

 You can read more on Rhine Girl about my new discoveries.






Thursday, November 1, 2012

Best Homemade Gifts: Food, Fiber, Photo and More, Pt. 1


Part 1 Food




The Holiday Season is coming up fast.  It used to sneak up on me like a thief in the night.  There I was, out in the crowds frantically trying to snag last-minute gifts, when I wanted to be home baking cookies, or just enjoying sweet Christmas music while admiring my decorated tree and candles glowing in the windows.. 


I still have to do some shopping.  Let’s get real.  I can’t make everything. 

But I can make a lot.  And I do.  Right now I’ve got four knitted gifts on the shelf for gift-giving. 

I get into the full swing starting this month, November, and continue right on up to the big day.  I keep finding things to make…thank you, Pinterest!

Knitting and crocheting pretty much finished, I'm looking at food gifts now.  Here are some of my favorite.


I’ve had more raves on food gifts than anything else.  People like to eat!  We make jams and jellies in the summer months,  and some of these turn into Christmas gifts.  Just tie a ribbon or rafia around the top of the jar, and that’s it. 

I like to make winter jam, though, expressly for Christmas giving.  And one of the best I’ve made is “Christmas Jam” from my Southern Heritage Gift Receipts Cookbook. 


                                                                                                                      
Christmas Jam                                                                                                                              

1 (8-oz.) jar maraschino cherries, undrained
1 (20-oz). can pineapple chunks, drained
2 (6-oz.) packages dried apricots
3 ½ cups water
6 cups sugar

Drain cherries, reserving juice;  cut cherries into quarters and set aside.

Combine reserved cherry juice, pineapple, apricots, and water in a flat-bottomed kettle; stir well.  Let stand 1 hour.

Cook fruit mixture over medium heat 20 minutes or until apricots are tender.  Reduce heat; add sugar, stirring occasionally until sugar dissolves.  Bring to a boil; boil stirring frequently, until mixture registers 216 degrees on a candy thermometer.  Add reserved cherries, stirring constantly, until mixture registers 220 degrees, or until mixture sheets from a cold metal spoon.  Remove from heat.

Quickly ladle jam into hot sterilized jars, leaving 1/4 –inch headspace.  Cover at once with metal lids, and screw bands tight.  Process in boiling-water bath 4 minutes.  Yield: 3 ½ pints or 7 half pints.


The above jam is beautiful in the cute little Ball jars, colorful with the cherries.  It just looks like Christmas.  And it tastes scruptious.  I tied red satin ribbons around the jar necks, and that was that.


About three years ago, and again last year, I made Orange Marmalade.  Seems like schools in this area have the students sell oranges, and I always buy a box.  That’s why I decided to make the marmalade.  And citrus is just good in the winter months.  I’ve had more raves over the Orange Marmalade than anything.  It’s hard to make enough for us to keep because it is that good. 


 I used Sure-Jel from the grocery shelves for this one last year.  The recipe that comes inside the box uses lemons as well as oranges.

One warning:  Orange marmalade is not so quickly made compared to other jams and jellies.  The trickiest part is cutting the rind off the fruit and then scraping the white pith off with a sharp knife.  I hate that part, and Gary (my husband) did it for me last year.  Then you slice the rind into thin strips and boil them with baking soda before adding them to the rest of the fruit with the sugar. 


It always turns out perfect  for me when I add about a half-minute more to the suggested final boiling time.  I got that from my mother-in-law years ago.  She said she always extended the called-for boiling time for her jams and jellies about an extra 30 seconds.  Then she turned the heat off and let the mixture stand on the burner, while she got the jars out of the hot water and lined them up on a towel.  I do the exact same thing.

My Southern Heritage Cookbook, mentioned above, has a recipe for Orange-Lemon Marmalade, and it’s a good one, just a little longer to make.  I might make it this year again.

                                


                                                                                                                                               

Here in my community, neighbors take food gifts around to the houses to give.  One neighbor down the road makes homemade sausage.  We really look forward to that.  Another makes a tin of fudge, or cookies some years.  Cookies are the most popular.  My mother-in-law gave gifts of her homemade jams and jellies on Christmas day to the neighbors. 

We are a gluten-free household because of my youngest son having celiac disease, so all of our baked goods are minus gluten.  The best  cookie we’ve made, gluten-free, are the pressed spritz sugar cookies.  Last two years my son and granddaughter have made them.  They’re practically melt-in-your-mouth.

If you aren't gluten-free, you will still think they are one of the best, lightest cookies ever.

I can’t remember where I first got the recipe, but here it is:
  
  


Gluten-Free Spritz Cookies                                                        

2/3 cup sugar
1 cup butter
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla
½ tsp almond extract
1 ½ cups white rice flour, ½ cup potato starch, ½ cup tapioca flour (or 2 ½ cups white flour blend like Bob’s Red Mill)
½ tsp xanthan gum (unless it is included in the flour blend)
½ tsp. salt

Cream butter and sugar.  Add egg and extracts.  Beat few minutes.  Combine dry ingredients and add to mixer.  Mix about 30 seconds.

Bake at 375 degrees for 6-8 minutes, until edges are lightly browned.  Watch carefully, depending on your oven, because these bake fast.

We decorate them by brushing tops with beaten egg white and then sprinkling with colored sugar.  Or making tinted confectioner’s sugar icing and using sprinkles. 

                                                                                                                               



One year I gave my nieces a basket of oranges with one of the Pampered Chef citrus peelers.   Another year I baked pies for them in glass pie plates they could keep.  They were newly married, so this was a good addition to their bakeware. 

Then I’ve made the hot chocolate mixes, which everyone loves.  The mocha mix was a big hit.  You can’t beat homemade fudge.  We like the Hershey’s Cocoa recipe, which I’ve made since I was a child.  We also can devour platters of peanut butter fudge, made following the recipe on the jar of marshmallow cream for chocolate fudge, switching the amount of chocolate for peanut butter.  This is one truly addictive treat.

I made a trail mix for my mother-in-law one year, after she’d eaten some of what I made to take on a long driving trip.  So I made her a bag of her own. 

I put just about everything in my trail mix…remembering we are gluten-free.

Nuts, both dark and white raisins, chopped dried apricots and cherries and/or cranberries, chopped dates, chocolate chips or M & Ms, as many kinds of nuts as I can (sunflower, pistachio, and walnuts or pecans make for a good texture).   Sealed in gallon zipper bags, these are good for a long time.

Homemade bread is a great gift, and even better if you wrap it in a pretty kitchen towel.  That’s a double treat gift. 

Since we can and preserve so many foods from our garden, we never run out of gift-giving ideas.  When our bees were doing well—I think our queen flew away—Gary always had jars of honey for gifts.  People loved them and continue to ask for more.  One year he sent off and bought those plastic honey bear containers.  We tied ribbons around the bears’ necks.  What a great gift that was.

In this economy, making your own gifts is a great way to save, and I’ve found over the years that everybody loves homemade.  Teachers, pastors, mailmen, school bus drivers, co-workers, bosses, friends and family. 

The teachers in our family have said repeatedly they prefer gifts of food rather than anything.  When I taught adult court reporting, one of my favorite gifts was Godiva coffee!  




Now is the time to get going, seeing what you can make, finding innovative containers and decorations, and stocking those edible gifts away for the big day. 



Part 2, Fiber, I’ll have my favorite knitting, crochet, and sewing gifts from past years and this year.  It’s more than just pot holders!

Part 3, Photo, features the gifts I've made centered around photos, including scrapbooks of course, but many, many others using pictures.


For anyone interested in the Southern Heritage Cookbooks collection, I found them on Amazon.  Mine were a Christmas gift many years ago.  I might order these for a gift for someone else.  There are so many recipes on the web now, it hardly seems practical to have hardbacks, but I kept the best on my shelves when I downsized.  All the rest, boxes full, went to our library.

Women's Memoirs

Women's Memoirs
Women's Memoirs